WireGuard VPN Road Warrior Setup

WireGuard is a relatively new open-source software for creating VPN tunnels on the IP layer using state of the art cryptography. I attended a self-organized session by the creator and developer Jason Donenfeld at the 34c3 who explained how WireGuard works and how it can be used. I was quite impressed by it’s simplicity and gave it a try. It worked more or less out of the box. Now I created a more advanced setup for accessing my home network.

In this blog post, I will describe how you can use it to remotely access your home or corporate network from any external network as a so-called road warrior.

WireGuard VPN Software

Here is a good talk from the WireGuard developer Jason Donenfeld explaining what WireGuard can and how it works: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYztYCbV_8U:

Some key features from this talk:

  • WireGuard is a VPN solution (alternative/replacement for e.g. OpenVPN or IPsec).
  • The WireGuard setup and configuration is kept very simple.
  • It implements a layer 3 tunneling protocol for IPv4 and IPv6.
  • It’s written in  ~ 4k single lines of codes.
  • The encapsulated IP packets are inside UDP packets.
  • It uses state-of-the-art cryptography (only strong algorithms like Curve25519, ChaCha20, Poly1305 or BLAKE2 are supported and no other ciphers can be configured).
  • WireGuard runs in the Linux kernel (but there are also userspace implementations).
  • It can be managed using normal Linux networking tools like ip, iptables, …
  • Authentication is done using private/public keys, similar to SSH keys.
  • Clients can perform roaming, like in mosh (https://mosh.org/).
  • WireGuard does not respond to unauthenticated packages, so it is not possible to know if a server is running WireGuard if the sender is not authorized.
  • It provides perfect forward secrecy.
  • It does not disclose any identity because the public keys are never transmitted in cleartext over the internet.
  • The key exchange (ECDH) takes only 1 round trip time.
  • WireGuard is fast because it runs in the kernel space and because the used cryptographic algorithms are also very fast.

More infos, a whitepaper, setup instructions or demos can be found on the project website: https://www.wireguard.com/.

At some point, WireGuard will be integrated directly into the Linux kernel. Linus Torvalds said “it’s a work of art” and hopes it will be merged soon into the kernel:  https://lists.openwall.net/netdev/2018/08/02/124.

Road Warrior Scenario

A road warrior is a person that uses a mobile client (e.g. notebook or mobile phone) to connect to their corporate or home network.

Features of this setup:

  • The internal IPv4 and IPv6 intrastructure can be accessed from everywhere via IPv4 and IPv6.
  • The WireGuard VPN client can be installed and used on Linux and mobile phones like Android.
  • Either all traffic (default route) or only the traffic desired for the internal network can be routed through the VPN (split tunneling). This can be configured on the client.
  • If a road warrior does not have an IPv6 connection, this can be provided through the VPN tunnel.
  • The VPN server can also be behind a NAT router, because WireGuard works over UDP.

Note: If the road warrior establishes a VPN connection with the mobile phone and uses the mobile phone as a WiFi hotspot for another device (like a notebook), the traffic from the WiFi hotspot is not routed through the VPN. I’m not sure why this is the case but this is maybe a limitation of the OS on the mobile phone.

WireGuard Software Installation

Install WireGuard according to the installation instructions (https://www.wireguard.com/install/).

Debian

Adding the WireGuard repo and install the wireguard package:

$ echo "deb http://deb.debian.org/debian/ unstable main" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/unstable-wireguard.list
$ printf 'Package: *\nPin: release a=unstable\nPin-Priority: 150\n' | sudo tee /etc/apt/preferences.d/limit-unstable
$ sudo apt update
$ sudo apt install wireguard

Raspberry Pi

On a Raspberry Pi, you have to compile it manually according to these installation instructions: https://github.com/adrianmihalko/raspberrypiwireguard. However, you don’t need to install the kernel headers via rpi-soruce as mentioned. The following commands are enough for the installation on a Raspberry Pi:

$ sudo apt-get install libmnl-dev build-essential git
$ git clone https://git.zx2c4.com/WireGuard
$ cd WireGuard/
$ cd src/
$ make
$ sudo make install

Arch Linux

Installing two packages from the official repositories:

$ sudo pacman -S wireguard-dkms wireguard-tools

Android

Install the WireGuard app from the play store: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wireguard.android&hl=en. This application implements WireGuard in the userspace. Therefore, the phone does not have to be rooted in order to use WireGuard.

Installation Test

You can test if the kernel module wireguard is loaded:

$ lsmod | grep -i wireguard
wireguard             147456  0
ip6_udp_tunnel         16384  1 wireguard
udp_tunnel             16384  1 wireguard
ipv6                  434176  33 nf_conntrack_ipv6,nf_nat_masquerade_ipv6,nf_defrag_ipv6,wireguard,nf_nat_ipv6

Server Key Generation

The configuration is performed in the /etc/wireguard directory.  Generate a private and public key for the server:

# cd /etc/wireguard
# wg genkey | tee server-private.key | wg pubkey > server-public.key
# ls -l server-private.key server-public.key 
-rw------- 1 root root 45 Sep 23 17:26 server-private.key
-rw------- 1 root root 45 Sep 23 17:26 server-public.key

Example server keys:

# cat server-private.key server-public.key
mNt0Gx2Af/OCkT9FchX3nybsaXUAerglnuMnSud4z1k=
3oPm1WH3RXv+8zCEQ7onRAYJWAvuHKo/1OfIiTE5LDc=

Client Key Generation

Generate a private and public key for every client. Note: These keys can also completely be generated on the client.

Notebook:

# cd /etc/wireguard
# wg genkey | tee notebook-private.key | wg pubkey > notebook-public.key
# ls -l notebook-* 
-rw------- 1 root root 45 Sep 23 17:30 notebook-private.key
-rw------- 1 root root 45 Sep 23 17:30 notebook-public.key

Example keys:

# cat notebook-private.key notebook-public.key 
OPTN5qb4FFulEBFLlrmC1sFTawT6AmdhsAbigpCMemw=
UGyBshzPfAH0U4QAgGJHe07LfUz4RcHA9PhUlUC4cCA=

The same for the mobile phone:

# wg genkey | tee mobile-private.key | wg pubkey > mobile-public.key
# ls -l mobile*
-rw------- 1 root root 45 Sep 23 17:31 mobile-private.key
-rw------- 1 root root 45 Sep 23 17:31 mobile-public.key
# cat mobile-private.key mobile-public.key
kKcKPZoC4gULXOmpDi54sAy5tQvnFEn6J8yXC8OxukY=
1xy8XRtUQT/9AwYWlEXsWCezNjfiFjXaBy40UUtAWBo=

Server Configuration

WireGuard

Create a new configuration file for the server in /etc/wireguard/wg0.conf. The filename specifies the name of the VPN network interface. In this case, the new network interface will be named wg0.

# cd /etc/wireguard 
# ls -l wg0.conf 
-rw------- 1 root root 713 Sep 23 17:33 wg0.conf
# cat wg0.conf 
[Interface]
Address = 10.23.5.1/24, fc00:23:5::1/64
ListenPort = 1500
PrivateKey = mNt0Gx2Af/OCkT9FchX3nybsaXUAerglnuMnSud4z1k=
PreUp = iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -s 10.23.5.0/24  -o enxb827eb7dc89a -j MASQUERADE; ip6tables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -s fc00:23:5::/64 -o enxb827eb7dc89a -j MASQUERADE
PostDown = iptables -t nat -D POSTROUTING -s 10.23.5.0/24  -o enxb827eb7dc89a -j MASQUERADE; ip6tables -t nat -D POSTROUTING -s fc00:23:5::/64 -o enxb827eb7dc89a -j MASQUERADE

# Notebook
[Peer]
PublicKey = UGyBshzPfAH0U4QAgGJHe07LfUz4RcHA9PhUlUC4cCA=
AllowedIPs = 10.23.5.2/32, fc00:23:5::2/128

# Mobile
[Peer]
PublicKey = 1xy8XRtUQT/9AwYWlEXsWCezNjfiFjXaBy40UUtAWBo=
AllowedIPs = 10.23.5.3/32, fc00:23:5::3/128

Configuration explanation Interface section:

  • Address: The server gets the IPv4 address 10.23.5.1/24 and IPv6 address fc00:23:5::1/64 assigned.
  • ListenPort: The server will listen for UDP packets on the port 1500.
  • PrivateKey: This is the private key of the server generated earlier.
  • PreUp: An iptables/ip6tables rule in the nat chain is added before the interface is created for performing NAT between the VPN clients and the destination. The interface (-o enxb827eb7dc89a) has to be adjusted according to the name of the outgoing interface on the VPN server.
  • PreDown: When the VPN server is stopped, the NAT rules will be removed.

Configuration explanation Peer section:

  • PublicKey: The public key of the clients (generated before)
  • AllowedIPs: This is the most complicated configuration option that confused me a bit in the beginning. This option always includes only IP addresses or networks that are available on the remote site. It’s not an IP address/network outside the tunnel (so no configuration from which public IP address a client is allowed to connect) but only addresses/networks which are transported inside the tunnel! In a road warrior scenario, where the client does not provide a whole network to the server, the netmask is always /32 on IPv4 or /128 on IPv6. Packets on the VPN server with this destination IP addresses are sent to this specified peer. This peer is also only allowed to send packages from this source IP address to the VPN server. It’s also important to know that there are no peers with the same AllowedIPs addresses/networks inside the same configuration file. If this would be the case, the server would not know to which peer the server has to send packages matching multiple peers with the same network configured.

IP Forwarding

IP forwarding has to be enabled on both IPv4 and IPv6. Creating the configuration file  /etc/sysctl.d/wireguard.conf:

# ls -l /etc/sysctl.d/wireguard.conf 
-rw------- 1 root root 53 Sep 25 22:23 /etc/sysctl.d/wireguard.conf
# cat /etc/sysctl.d/wireguard.conf 
net.ipv4.ip_forward=1
net.ipv6.conf.all.forwarding=1

Loading the configuration:

# sysctl -p /etc/sysctl.d/wireguard.conf
net.ipv4.ip_forward = 1
net.ipv6.conf.all.forwarding = 1

Client Configuration

Routing all Traffic (Default Route)

Configuration file which will route all traffic through the VPN:

# cd /etc/wireguard
# ls -l client-notebook_dgw.conf 
-rw------- 1 root root 245 Sep 23 20:34 client-notebook_dgw.conf
# cat client-notebook_dgw.conf 
[Interface]
PrivateKey = OPTN5qb4FFulEBFLlrmC1sFTawT6AmdhsAbigpCMemw=
Address = 10.23.5.2/24, fc00:23:5::2/64
DNS = 8.8.8.8

[Peer]
PublicKey = 3oPm1WH3RXv+8zCEQ7onRAYJWAvuHKo/1OfIiTE5LDc=
Endpoint = wg.example.com:1500
AllowedIPs = 0.0.0.0/0, ::/0

Configuration explanation Interface section:

  • Address: The client gets the IPv4 address 10.23.5.2/24 and IPv6 address fc00:23:5::2/64 assigned.
  • PrivateKey: This is the private key of the client.
  • DNS: This DNS server is used on the client. This could be a DNS server in the remote network.

Configuration explanation Peer section:

  • PublicKey: This is the public key of the VPN server.
  • Endpoint: This is the hostname of the VPN server.
  • AllowedIPs: All traffic matching these networks is sent through the VPN tunnel. In this case, 0.0.0.0/0 and ::/0 means, that all IPv4 and all IPv6 traffic is routed through the VPN.

Split Tunneling

Configuration file which will route only the traffic for the VPN (10.23.5.0/24 and fc00:23:5::/64) and for the remote network (192.168.1.0/24) through the VPN.

# cd /etc/wireguard
# ls -l client-mobile_splittunnel.conf 
-rw------- 1 root root 355 Sep 23 20:39 client-mobile_splittunnel.conf
# cat client-mobile_splittunnel.conf
[Interface]
PrivateKey = kKcKPZoC4gULXOmpDi54sAy5tQvnFEn6J8yXC8OxukY=
Address = 10.23.5.3/24, fc00:23:5::3/64
DNS = 8.8.8.8

[Peer]
PublicKey = 3oPm1WH3RXv+8zCEQ7onRAYJWAvuHKo/1OfIiTE5LDc=
Endpoint = wg.example.com:1500
AllowedIPs = 10.23.5.0/24, fc00:23:5::/64, 192.168.1.0/24, 2001:db8:23:5::/64

The only difference is the AllowedIPs directive, which creates a split tunneling VPN setup. Only the traffic for the provided networks is routed through the VPN.

Server Usage

Start/Stop Manually

Starting the VPN server manually:

# wg-quick up wg0
[#] iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -s 10.23.5.0/24 -o enxb827eb7dc89a -j MASQUERADE; ip6tables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -s fc00:23:5::/64 -o enxb827eb7dc89a -j MASQUERADE
[#] ip link add wg0 type wireguard
[#] wg setconf wg0 /dev/fd/63
[#] ip address add 10.23.5.1/24 dev wg0
[#] ip address add fc00:23:5::1/64 dev wg0
[#] ip link set mtu 1420 dev wg0
[#] ip link set wg0 up
[#] ip route add fc00:23:5::/64 dev wg0

Stopping the service again:

# wg-quick down wg0
[#] ip link delete dev wg0
[#] iptables -t nat -D POSTROUTING -s 10.23.5.0/24 -o enxb827eb7dc89a -j MASQUERADE; ip6tables -t nat -D POSTROUTING -s fc00:23:5::/64 -o enxb827eb7dc89a -j MASQUERADE

Start/Stop using systemd

Starting the service using systemd:

# systemctl start wg-quick@wg0

Showing details about the service:

# systemctl status wg-quick@wg0
● wg-quick@wg0.service - WireGuard via wg-quick(8) for wg0
Loaded: loaded (/lib/systemd/system/wg-quick@.service; enabled; vendor preset: en
Active: active (exited) since Sun 2018-09-23 20:48:10 CEST; 9s ago
Docs: man:wg-quick(8)
man:wg(8)
https://www.wireguard.com/
https://www.wireguard.com/quickstart/
https://git.zx2c4.com/WireGuard/about/src/tools/man/wg-quick.8
https://git.zx2c4.com/WireGuard/about/src/tools/man/wg.8
Process: 18609 ExecStart=/usr/bin/wg-quick up wg0 (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
Main PID: 18609 (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)

Sep 23 20:48:09 wgpi systemd[1]: Starting WireGuard via wg-quick(8) for wg0...
Sep 23 20:48:09 wgpi wg-quick[18609]: [#] iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -s 10.23.5.
Sep 23 20:48:10 wgpi wg-quick[18609]: [#] ip link add wg0 type wireguard
Sep 23 20:48:10 wgpi wg-quick[18609]: [#] wg setconf wg0 /dev/fd/63
Sep 23 20:48:10 wgpi wg-quick[18609]: [#] ip address add 10.23.5.1/24 dev wg0
Sep 23 20:48:10 wgpi wg-quick[18609]: [#] ip address add fc00:23:5::1/64 dev wg0
Sep 23 20:48:10 wgpi wg-quick[18609]: [#] ip link set mtu 1420 dev wg0
Sep 23 20:48:10 wgpi wg-quick[18609]: [#] ip link set wg0 up
Sep 23 20:48:10 wgpi wg-quick[18609]: [#] ip route add fc00:23:5::/64 dev wg0
Sep 23 20:48:10 wgpi systemd[1]: Started WireGuard via wg-quick(8) for wg0.

Stopping the service again:

# systemctl stop wg-quick@wg0

The service is now stopped:

# systemctl status wg-quick@wg0
● wg-quick@wg0.service - WireGuard via wg-quick(8) for wg0
Loaded: loaded (/lib/systemd/system/wg-quick@.service; enabled; vendor preset: en
Active: inactive (dead) since Sun 2018-09-23 20:48:25 CEST; 37s ago
Docs: man:wg-quick(8)
man:wg(8)
https://www.wireguard.com/
https://www.wireguard.com/quickstart/
https://git.zx2c4.com/WireGuard/about/src/tools/man/wg-quick.8
https://git.zx2c4.com/WireGuard/about/src/tools/man/wg.8
Process: 18667 ExecStop=/usr/bin/wg-quick down wg0 (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
Process: 18609 ExecStart=/usr/bin/wg-quick up wg0 (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
Main PID: 18609 (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)

Sep 23 20:48:10 wgpi wg-quick[18609]: [#] ip address add 10.23.5.1/24 dev wg0
Sep 23 20:48:10 wgpi wg-quick[18609]: [#] ip address add fc00:23:5::1/64 dev wg0
Sep 23 20:48:10 wgpi wg-quick[18609]: [#] ip link set mtu 1420 dev wg0
Sep 23 20:48:10 wgpi wg-quick[18609]: [#] ip link set wg0 up
Sep 23 20:48:10 wgpi wg-quick[18609]: [#] ip route add fc00:23:5::/64 dev wg0
Sep 23 20:48:10 wgpi systemd[1]: Started WireGuard via wg-quick(8) for wg0.
Sep 23 20:48:25 wgpi systemd[1]: Stopping WireGuard via wg-quick(8) for wg0...
Sep 23 20:48:25 wgpi wg-quick[18667]: [#] ip link delete dev wg0
Sep 23 20:48:25 wgpi wg-quick[18667]: [#] iptables -t nat -D POSTROUTING -s 10.23.5.
Sep 23 20:48:25 wgpi systemd[1]: Stopped WireGuard via wg-quick(8) for wg0.

Automatically start the service when the system is started:

# systemctl enable wg-quick@wg0

Disable the service on startup again:

# systemctl disable wg-quick@wg0

Verifying

A new network interface wg0 is created when the service is started:

# ip a l wg0
26: wg0: <POINTOPOINT,NOARP,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1420 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN group default qlen 1000
link/none 
inet 10.23.5.1/24 scope global wg0
valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
inet6 fc00:23:5::1/64 scope global 
valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever

The route is sent according to the AllowedIPs directive:

# ip route
default via 192.168.1.1 dev enxb827eb7dc89a src 192.168.1.10 metric 202 
10.23.5.0/24 dev wg0 proto kernel scope link src 10.23.5.1 
192.168.1.0/24 dev enxb827eb7dc89a proto kernel scope link src 192.168.1.10 metric 202

Showing the current configuration:

# wg show
interface: wg0
public key: 3oPm1WH3RXv+8zCEQ7onRAYJWAvuHKo/1OfIiTE5LDc=
private key: (hidden)
listening port: 1500

peer: UGyBshzPfAH0U4QAgGJHe07LfUz4RcHA9PhUlUC4cCA=
allowed ips: 10.23.5.2/32, fc00:23:5::2/32
peer: 1xy8XRtUQT/9AwYWlEXsWCezNjfiFjXaBy40UUtAWBo=
allowed ips: 10.23.5.3/32, fc00:23:5::3/32

More data are shown if the clients are connected:

# wg show
interface: wg0
public key: 3oPm1WH3RXv+8zCEQ7onRAYJWAvuHKo/1OfIiTE5LDc=
private key: (hidden)
listening port: 1500

peer: 1xy8XRtUQT/9AwYWlEXsWCezNjfiFjXaBy40UUtAWBo=
endpoint: 178.197.42.137:18822
allowed ips: 10.23.5.3/32, fc00:23:5::3/128
latest handshake: 4 seconds ago
transfer: 788 B received, 732 B sent

peer: UGyBshzPfAH0U4QAgGJHe07LfUz4RcHA9PhUlUC4cCA=
endpoint: 178.197.42.137:18821
allowed ips: 10.23.5.2/32, fc00:23:5::2/128
latest handshake: 16 seconds ago
transfer: 6.61 KiB received, 6.07 KiB sent

Showing the detailed interface configuration:

# wg showconf wg0
[Interface]
ListenPort = 1500
PrivateKey = mNt0Gx2Af/OCkT9FchX3nybsaXUAerglnuMnSud4z1k=

[Peer]
PublicKey = UGyBshzPfAH0U4QAgGJHe07LfUz4RcHA9PhUlUC4cCA=

[Peer]
PublicKey = 1xy8XRtUQT/9AwYWlEXsWCezNjfiFjXaBy40UUtAWBo=
AllowedIPs = 10.23.5.0/24, fc00:23:5::/64

Client Usage

Copying the client configuration file to /etc/wireguard:

# cd /etc/wireguard 
# ls -l wg0.conf 
-rw------- 1 root root 245 Sep 23 21:17 wg0.conf
# cat wg0.conf
[Interface]
PrivateKey = OPTN5qb4FFulEBFLlrmC1sFTawT6AmdhsAbigpCMemw=
Address = 10.23.5.2/24, fc00:23:5::2/64
DNS = 8.8.8.8

[Peer]
PublicKey = 3oPm1WH3RXv+8zCEQ7onRAYJWAvuHKo/1OfIiTE5LDc=
Endpoint = wg.example.com:1500
AllowedIPs = 0.0.0.0/0, ::/0

Starting the service in the same way as on the server:

# wg-quick up wg0
[#] ip link add wg0 type wireguard
[#] wg setconf wg0 /dev/fd/63
[#] ip address add 10.23.5.2/24 dev wg0
[#] ip address add fc00:23:5::2/64 dev wg0
[#] ip link set mtu 1420 dev wg0
[#] ip link set wg0 up
[#] resolvconf -a tun.wg0 -m 0 -x
[#] wg set wg0 fwmark 51820
[#] ip -6 route add ::/0 dev wg0 table 51820
[#] ip -6 rule add not fwmark 51820 table 51820
[#] ip -6 rule add table main suppress_prefixlength 0
[#] ip -4 route add 0.0.0.0/0 dev wg0 table 51820
[#] ip -4 rule add not fwmark 51820 table 51820
[#] ip -4 rule add table main suppress_prefixlength

A new network interface was created:

# ip a l wg0
4: wg0: <POINTOPOINT,NOARP,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1420 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN group default qlen 1
link/none 
inet 10.23.5.2/24 scope global wg0
valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
inet6 fc00:23:5::2/64 scope global 
valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever

The VPN works:

# ping 10.23.5.1
PING 10.23.5.1 (10.23.5.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 10.23.5.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=284 ms
64 bytes from 10.23.5.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=63.3 ms
64 bytes from 10.23.5.1: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=225 ms
64 bytes from 10.23.5.1: icmp_seq=4 ttl=64 time=150 ms
^C
--- 10.23.5.1 ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 4 received, 0% packet loss, time 3004ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 63.345/180.886/284.496/82.871 ms

Showing the connection:

# wg show
interface: wg0
public key: UGyBshzPfAH0U4QAgGJHe07LfUz4RcHA9PhUlUC4cCA=
private key: (hidden)
listening port: 52682
fwmark: 0xca6c

peer: 3oPm1WH3RXv+8zCEQ7onRAYJWAvuHKo/1OfIiTE5LDc=
endpoint: 178.194.23.5:1500
allowed ips: 0.0.0.0/0, ::/0
latest handshake: 5 seconds ago
transfer: 604 B received, 660 B sent

Because the AllowedIPs directive is configured to 0.0.0.0/0 and ::/0, all traffic is routed through the VPN:

# curl -L motd.ch/ip.php
178.194.23.5

Both IPv4 and IPv6 works through the tunnel:

Stoppping the VPN:

# wg-quick down wg0
[#] ip -4 rule delete table 51820
[#] ip -4 rule delete table main suppress_prefixlength 0
[#] ip -6 rule delete table 51820
[#] ip -6 rule delete table main suppress_prefixlength 0
[#] ip link delete dev wg0
[#] resolvconf -d tun.wg0

Starting via a systemd service:

# systemctl start wg-quick@wg0

Stopping via systemd:

# systemctl stop wg-quick@wg0

Status:

# systemctl status wg-quick@wg0
● wg-quick@wg0.service - WireGuard via wg-quick(8) for wg0
Loaded: loaded (/lib/systemd/system/wg-quick@.service; disabled; vendor prese
Active: inactive (dead)
Docs: man:wg-quick(8)
man:wg(8)
https://www.wireguard.com/
https://www.wireguard.com/quickstart/
https://git.zx2c4.com/WireGuard/about/src/tools/man/wg-quick.8
https://git.zx2c4.com/WireGuard/about/src/tools/man/wg.8

Sep 23 21:54:35 dimmbar wg-quick[1629]: [#] ip -4 rule add table main suppress_p
Sep 23 21:54:35 dimmbar systemd[1]: Started WireGuard via wg-quick(8) for wg0.
Sep 23 21:54:46 dimmbar systemd[1]: Stopping WireGuard via wg-quick(8) for wg0..
Sep 23 21:54:47 dimmbar wg-quick[1732]: [#] ip -4 rule delete table 51820
Sep 23 21:54:47 dimmbar wg-quick[1732]: [#] ip -4 rule delete table main suppres
Sep 23 21:54:47 dimmbar wg-quick[1732]: [#] ip -6 rule delete table 51820
Sep 23 21:54:47 dimmbar wg-quick[1732]: [#] ip -6 rule delete table main suppres
Sep 23 21:54:47 dimmbar wg-quick[1732]: [#] ip link delete dev wg0
Sep 23 21:54:47 dimmbar wg-quick[1732]: [#] resolvconf -d tun.wg0
Sep 23 21:54:47 dimmbar systemd[1]: Stopped WireGuard via wg-quick(8) for wg0.

Mobile Client Usage

Generating q QR code for the mobile client:

# qrencode -t ansiutf8 < client-mobile_splittunnel.conf

Adding a new VPN connection by selecting Create from QR code:

Scanning the QR code:

Enabling the VPN:

A new network interface was created with the configured IP addresses:

Accessing the remote network:

It’s also possible to reach other VPN clients (the firewall does not prevent that):

Because split tunneling is used, the normal network traffic does not go through the VPN box:

References

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